The Five People You Meet in Heaven – Mitch Albom; A Review

The book begins on the day of Eddie’s death.
It’s a day much the same as any other in Eddie’s life, with the little routines and interactions he repeats day after day. The day however, is made unique by an unpredictable event, and a choice Eddie makes beginning him on his journey through heaven where he meets five people who his life has intersetected with in some way.
I picked this one from my TBR pile as I fancied a quick un-taxing read. Just below two hundred pages, it feels more like six short stories with the clearly separated parts (last day on earth, the first person…).

The fourth and fifth people he met were the ones that hit me hardest, and had me crying. Its reminiscent of The Green Mile, and how the story reflects on a moment of a man’s life, (though with less mice and magic).

It pulls at your heart strings, plays with your expectations and is a very satisfying read. Eddie’s story is simple, and relatable.
Its currently with my mum who spotted this on the side, and requested it immediately.
4/5
Eddie is a wounded war veteran, an old man who has lived, in his mind, an uninspired life.
His job is fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. On his 83rd birthday, a tragic accident kills him as he tries to save a little girl from a falling cart.
He awakes in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a destination. It’s a place where your life is explained to you by five people, some of whom you knew, others who may have been strangers…”
Similar books to try;

Veronika Decides to Die; Paulo Coelho

The Lovely Bones; Alice Sebold

A Man Called Ove; Fredrik Backman

4 thoughts on “The Five People You Meet in Heaven – Mitch Albom; A Review

  1. […] All The Light We Cannot See was this month’s book club choice, and as this has been on my TBR pile for a while it makes this read feel like a double accomplishment. First off, the writing in this book is beautiful. As beautiful as the cover imaging. The story is set primarily between France and Germany, with the lion share of the story unfolding between 1934 and 1944. The narrative tracks primarily Werner and Marie-Laure; Werner is a very gifted orphan whos father passed away in a mining accident who finds a way to escape working in the mines himself, Marie-Laure is a gifted, charming blind girl who’s life changes completely when her and her father have to escape occupied Paris for Saint-Malo. I finished this book in about six days, a combination of how addictive this book is and the fact I had a couple days off spent primarily at Whitsand Bay. Anthony Doerr created a world I wanted to dive into at every spare moment, I was desperate to find how Werner and Marie-Laure’s stories would entwine. I found the first two thirds of the novel more enjoyable than the final third. As much as I enjoyed this novel, I will be donating it to charity. I’m glad this came into my life, but I will not be recommending it at the same level of overexcitement which I did Pet Sematary of The Five People You Meet in Heaven. […]

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