Six Reasons to See Matilda The Musical before it Leaves Plymouth

Matilda the musical has been at Plymouth’s Theatre Royal for the last few weeks, and I am so sad I didn’t get to watch this as a child.

I got invited to attend on a press ticket in January, and I’m so grateful. I was previously part of the Theatre Royal’s Blogger Programme, and have been visiting the Theatre since I was earning enough to buy my own tickets.

This was the first musical I’ve taken Matt to see, and I’m glad. The humour, sharp wit, and Matilda’s sense of wrong and right make for such a unique show.

I really enjoyed the shows. The songs are catchy and stuck in your head, they gave a much loved classic a really original spin. Here are a few of the reasons I would recommend the show;

1) The set is incredibly detailed. The show is framed by Scrabble tile like letter boxes, which spell out key words from the story. As the play goes on, it’s like a word search as they appear before your eyes.

2) The choreography is something else. Be it the alphabet the older students compose on the gates of Crunchem Hall, of the swings in When I Grow Up.

3)The Trunchball is equal parts hilarious and terrifying. I didn’t go into this thinking i would enjoy a song about The Chokey

4) The Children are so incredibly talented.

5) The songs are catchy. Just mentioning the show in work the next morning resulted in two of my colleagues, unprompted breaking into Revolting Children. I am still humming When I Grow Up and Miracle.

6) The story about The Escapologist & The Acrobat had me crying. It’s beautifully told, and terribly bitter sweet.

The only change I would want, would be for the show to last longer. I would have loved to see a bit more of the story, but not enough for any part of the play to be removed.

The show is in Plymouth until February 16th (Saturday), and with a handful of £10 tickets at each show for 16-25 year olds.

(For anyone suffering withdrawal like symptoms, the Matilda film with Mara Wilson is currently on Netflix)

[The tickets were gifted by the Theatre Royal, but the words and opinions are all my own. Photos are courtesy of]

A Theatre Review: The Here and This and Now

Going into a show with the lightest understanding of what it may entail, definitely leaves for an interesting experience. What I took away from my brief reading of The Here and This and Now on the Theatres website, was a comment on society, and our reliance on things to experience life (never rely too heavily on a Kindle related comment for context). The play itself was a layered look at the business world, and the effect it can have on the physical world, interspaced with character discussions of thier experiences with happiness; past, present and potential happiness.
The plays core revolves around McCabe, a pharmaceutical company who specialise in “Me To” lines of drugs. Products which were revolutionary months ago, and now have a slight spin to separate from the original. Products that rely upon Salesmanship and “likeableilty” to succeed in a saturated market. It tracks those connected to the company Pre, during and post- event. The story begins at break neck speed with four characters yelling “CAPTIVATE” and “DESTROY” whilst moving around the stage before moving directly into a two person conversation, I found myself focusing on Nial in an attempt to add any context or back story to what I was hearing.

 

The story has three key segments; The Away Day, Helens Presentation and McCabe’s Promotional Video. It’s a plot I don’t wish to decode too explicitly, as I feel it’s intended to impact you on a unique and personal level. There are elements of Orwell and King in the second part, and parallels to stories like Never Let Me Go in the final section, or in the least the ethical questions contained within Never Let Me Go.

There are parallels to what Black Mirror has attempted to do with its comments on society. Sometimes dark and poignant, very human and current. It’s difficult to pin down and define, calling instead for dissections and debate over drinks directly after. I worry that it is dreamlike, in that the more you try desperately to grasp at what you experienced in the last two hours, the more it escapes.

Tickets for the show come in at £15 (£11 for concessions), with it running until March 25th.

– Emily

The Theatre Royal Plymouth gifted these tickets as part of thier Blogger Scheme, as always the words and opinions are completely my own.